Quotes

Quote: “Helping adults elaborate, create, and transform their meaning schemes…”

“Helping adults elaborate, create, and transform their meaning schemes (beliefs, feelings, interpretations, decisions) through reflection on their content, the process by which they were learned, and their premises (social context, history, and consequences) is what andragogy is about.“

Mezirow, J. (1991). Transformative dimensions of adult learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Quote: “… the ‘stuff’ to be learned…cannot just be ‘told’ to these people…”

“Perhaps the most important difference is that the ‘stuff’ to be learned—information, concepts, relationships, and so on—cannot just be ‘told’ to these people. It must be learned by them, through questions, discovery, construction, interaction, and, above all, fun.”

Prensky, Marc (2001). Digital Game-Based Learning, Toronto: McGraw-Hill. page 17

Quote: “Midwife-teachers are the opposite of banker-teachers…”

“Midwife-teachers are the opposite of banker-teachers. While the bankers deposit knowledge in the learner’s head, the midwives draw it out. They assist the students in giving birth to their own ideas, in making their own tacit knowledge explicit and elaborating it…Midwife-teachers focus not on their own knowledge (as the lecturer does) but on the students’ knowledge. They contribute when needed, but it is always clear that the baby is not theirs but the student’s.”

Belenky, M. F., Clinchy, B.M., Goldberger, N.R., & Tarule, J.M. (1986). Women’s way of knowing: The development of self, voice and mind. New York: Basic

Quote: “Student learn not by attending lectures…”

“Students learn not by attending lectures and taking notes, but by becoming involved with the content to be learned. Continued reliance upon teaching strategies that encourage only passive attention to the content is a practice that warrants further attention. The nature of student involvement in the learning process is especially pertinent to the practice of distance education, for involvement is all too often only an elusive opportunity for the student separated by physical and temporal distance.”

Astin, A. (1985). Achieving excellence: A critical assessment of priorities and practices in higher education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Teachers and technology

“Teachers trained in one technology and mind-set sometimes find themselves gridlocked into old patterns and perceptions. Thrust into a world of new technologies, they persist in seeing them in terms of the familiar; the wordprocessor , for example, is viewed as a glorified typewriter with powerful editing features rather than as the idea processor it can be. To understand the computer’s power for idea processing and improved composition, one must take a computer home, live with it, and write with it. Only by embracing the technology can one experience the kind of immersion that breaks through the surface understandings to a deeper level of involvement.”

Jamieson McKenzie, (1991), Designing Staff Development for the Information Age, FromNowOn.Org-The Educational Technology Journal, Vol. 1, No. 4, April, 1991, http://fromnowon.org/fnoapr91.htm

Industrial Age thinking and teaching…

“Shifting from Industrial Age thinking and teaching to Informational Age thinking and teaching is as dramatic an adjustment as shifting from teaching in a classroom to teaching underwater. The training agenda is no simple list of skills; everybody must learn an entirely new approach. Actions that worked on the surface, such as running, jumping and yelling, create different effects underwater. Adaptation requires major readjustments and realignment. It requires immersion.”

Jamieson McKenzie, (1991), Designing Staff Development for the Information Age, FromNowOn.Org-The Educational Technology Journal, Vol. 1, No. 4, April, 1991, http://fromnowon.org/fnoapr91.htm