Category Archives: Learning

Video: Teaching Group Effectiveness

Faculty will often require students to work in groups on significant assignments that are high stakes but without taking the time to teach the students how to work effectively in a group.  And for that reason, groupwork will be quite frustrating.  Several years ago MRU developed the video to help faculty and students learn more about group effectiveness. It is still current, valuable and now available on YouTube.  http://youtu.be/OZabIUzgO0I

I have also built a Ed.TED lesson wrapped around this video that you may also find useful. It can be accessed at http://ed.ted.com/on/YVxzWttH 

Quote: “Helping adults elaborate, create, and transform their meaning schemes…”

“Helping adults elaborate, create, and transform their meaning schemes (beliefs, feelings, interpretations, decisions) through reflection on their content, the process by which they were learned, and their premises (social context, history, and consequences) is what andragogy is about.“

Mezirow, J. (1991). Transformative dimensions of adult learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Quote: “… the ‘stuff’ to be learned…cannot just be ‘told’ to these people…”

“Perhaps the most important difference is that the ‘stuff’ to be learned—information, concepts, relationships, and so on—cannot just be ‘told’ to these people. It must be learned by them, through questions, discovery, construction, interaction, and, above all, fun.”

Prensky, Marc (2001). Digital Game-Based Learning, Toronto: McGraw-Hill. page 17

Quote: “Student learn not by attending lectures…”

“Students learn not by attending lectures and taking notes, but by becoming involved with the content to be learned. Continued reliance upon teaching strategies that encourage only passive attention to the content is a practice that warrants further attention. The nature of student involvement in the learning process is especially pertinent to the practice of distance education, for involvement is all too often only an elusive opportunity for the student separated by physical and temporal distance.”

Astin, A. (1985). Achieving excellence: A critical assessment of priorities and practices in higher education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Students learn not be attending lectures…

“Students learn not be attending lectures and taking notes, but by becoming involved with the content to be learned. Continued reliance upon teaching strategies that encourage only passive attention to the content is a practice that warrants further attention. The nature of student involvement in the learning process is especially pertinent to the practice of distance education, for involvement is all too often only an elusive opportunity for the student separated by physical and temporal distance.”

Astin, A. (1985). Achieving excellence: A critical assessment of priorities and practices in higher education. San Franciso: Jossey-Bass.